Lean and Agile Software Development

Lean and Agile Software Development

Lean and Agile are so popular in Software development within the last 10 years, so that this group likes to diskuss and create a plattform for people who are interested in this topics.

Agile

Agile is a framework that focuses on iterative-development and feedback to build out a software product. Agile focuses on quality by making things like test-driven-development, continuous integration, and refactoring essential pillars of the process. By definition, agile fosters the creation of an adaptable and evolving team process – it accommodates the fact that each project is different, and processes need to fit the situation. Agile also emphasizes communication and collaboration over documentation – thus, it enables teams to move quicker by resolving things face-to-face. It also considers the customer a part of the team, thereby ensuring maximum feedback reaches the ultimate users, and allowing them in turn to change the course of the work product.

Agile methods usually measure things within the software development world – number of stories (scope), estimates (time), velocity (speed). This in turns drive costs and budgets.

Overall, Agile can be thought of as a framework for the software-construction (planning, development/QA, release) part of creating a product.

One of the most popular agile frameworks is Scrum. http://www.scrum-events.de/whatisscrum/index.php

Lean

Lean, on the other hand, is a management philosophy. Ultimately, it focuses on throughput (of whatever is being produced) by taking a strictly systems-level view of things. In other words, it doesn’t focus on particular components of the value-stream like code-construction or QA, but on whether all the components of the chain are working as efficiently as possible so as to generate as much overall value as possible. Value, of course, includes things like high-quality, and optimized for time and resources.

Lean is based on several things – queuing theory, the theory of constraints, concurrent engineering (set-based development) and delaying commitment to the last responsible moment. Careful metrics (only the ones that truly measure throughput: this often means going one level up) is an important part of lean – this allows everyone to be objective about everything. Speaking of which, Lean software recommends measuring things across the value chain – and as extended as that chain can be. It recommends measuring return on investment (ROI), customer satisfaction, customer usage patterns, market share, and so on. This in turn drives budgets and costs within the software organization.







http://www.scrum-events.de

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