Social Media Monitoring

Social Media Monitoring

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  • Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker
    Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Pepsi may have some problems but Nestle really seems to have no clue when it comes to managing its social media activities. This is an example how Greenpeace managed to create a lot of noise while Nestle's staff on Facebook dropped the ball. What a shame.

    FACT:
    Nestle, the world's largest supplier of processed foods, finds itself at the center of a number of boycotts relating to product ingredients, environmental issues, economic impact and labor practices of its sub-contractors.

    Greenpeace is attacking Nestle on a variety of issues.
    =========>

    VIRAL MARKETING CAMPAIGN
    Viral marketing is tough to master ===> http://commetrics.com/?p=4373

    But Greenpeace’s fake Kit-Kat commercial focusing on palm oil and deforestation is a great example how to launch a viral campaign. Once it was released on YouTube it quickly went viral ===> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaJjPRwExO8

    FACEBOOK TACTIC
    Fueled by the Greenpeace video, anti-Nestle discussions move away from activist blogs and land on Nestle’s Facebook fanpage.
    ===> http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nestle/24287259392

    Of course this is part of the well-planned campaign by Greenpeace

    NESTLE'S FACEBOOK TEAM FAILS SOCIAL MEDIA 101
    Team threatens to delete negative comments left on its wall by fans. This only adds fuel to the fire..... Sometime during last weekend, the team no longer responds to the attacks by writing replies, comments, etc.

    BOTTOM LINE
    Greenpeace gets an A+ for creating noise - but has it saved any rain forest... Here we have to be giving them a D at best. Worst is that users are continuing purchasing Kit-Kat ....

    Nestle gets an F for how it handled this social media battle. You have to take this space seriously. So plan, prepare and train for the attack that will come. Handling this like pros could have saved Nestle a lot of grief....

    ==> READ: Being ready for the next social media attack - don't get caught with your pants down. <===
    This post was modified on 27 Mar 2010 at 04:20 pm.
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    Tim Gier
    (not a XING member)
    Urs:

    Thank you for pointing out that while Greenpeace created substantial noise, they created little, if any, real & lasting social change. While I support the goals of reducing deforestation & environmentalism in general, I have to wonder if their tactics are designed more for the purposes of self-promotion & fundraising.
  • Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker
    Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Yes Greenpeace is a bit into fundraising and self-promotion as you write, I agree.

    But I would have expected a bit of greater understanding by the Nestlé crew regarding how to use social media effectively.. That they usually know what they are supposed to do is obvious (see below and cases)

    For instance, Nespresso's latest European spot by McCann Erickson's Paris office features George Clooney visiting heaven, where he encounters God in the shape of fellow actor John Malkovich.

    ===> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDUhttJMYBw

    Rival coffee marketer Lavazza has complained that the spot rips off its long-running Italian "Paradise" campaign, which has also featured white clouds and angels and St. Peter as delicious coffee is sipped in heaven.
    Video below is from Lavazza.
    Please, judge for yourself. After having watched the above video featuring Hollywood start George Clooney, I am no longer so sure if it is not a rip off from the Lavazza advertising campaign that has been running since 1995?

    ===> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sBmU3zbJnQ&feature=playe...

    Some suggest that Nespresso's success is rootet in democratizing the ‘real coffee’ experience via the simple operation of its machines.
    Whatever it is, Nespresso is now the fastest growing among the most important brands at a company that owns household names like Perrier water, Kit Kat, Felix cat food and, of course, Nestlé chocolate.

    ==============

    So consider the above teaching us a lesson about brand management, reputation and advertising.... Maye it tells us something about how to copy or imitate your competitor's successful advertising campaign without becoming a party in a lawsuit. Whatever it is, Nestlé hires the right guns to promote its brands effectively.

    But failing to understand that one's Facebook fanpage requires engagement, leaves me puzzled. Engagement has to be the mantra even during an adverse situation like the viral Greenpeace stunt....
    What went wrong here?

    ===>Who is in charge of social media at Nestlé and has he or she passed social media 101 ? <===

    Paul Bulcke, Nestlé's CEO is supposed to call me at 044 272 1876 (Switzerland) so we can work something out.

    Tim, thanks for sharing.
    This post was modified on 28 Mar 2010 at 12:20 pm.
  • Aldo Gnocchi
    Aldo Gnocchi    Premium Member
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    I know some people already boycotting Nestlé's product.

    So, there is already little change in the society.

    What's more: this Greenpeace campaign sharped my awareness for consumer goods.

    I am analyzing better what I buy or not.

    Bottom line: Greenpeace made a good job!
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    Tim Gier
    (not a XING member)
    Good morning Urs:

    The first thing that came to my mind when viewing the Clooney ad was the old Warren Beatty film "Heaven Can Wait," which is also echoed in the Lavazza ad (when the jogger runs up the stairway in heaven.) Perhaps both companies owe more to that film than to each other?

    Your larger point, and the real focus of your original post, is how otherwise savvy companies "miss it" when it comes to social media. That is a point on which we agree.

    I think that so many companies are so conditioned by decades of one-way communications TO their customers, that they just don't understand how to interact WITH them. Even the company that has an excellent customer service department - one that handles phone calls, emails and letters better than all the rest - is still not necessarily equipped to engage with real people in real time on their own terms. There is a huge difference between responding to someone at one's own pleasure and being part of an open, transparent and ongoing dialog that has a life of it's own, beyond anyone's control.

    For so long marketing & advertising has been about controlling the message. Those days are gone.
  • Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker
    Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Hi Aldo

    Thanks for the input and Yes, I agree with you that consumers refusing to buy such products can make a huge difference. Nothing hurts more than consumers no longer buying Kit Kat and other products, of course.

    Nevertheless, we seem to be forgetting a few things:

    1) For instance, the Declaration of Berne was founded in 1968 and one if its first projects was to fight Nestlé on its its way of selling baby formula to poor mothers in Africa:

    ===> http://www.bernedeclaration.ch/en/f25000030.html

    Yes the Declaration of Berne [Erklärung von Bern (EvB)] still fights worthy causes. For instance, questioning the appropriateness of handing out the WEF's Public Eye Award 2010 to Roche and Royal Bank of Canada.

    ===> http://www.bernedeclaration.ch/en/p25017061.html

    2) There are many other cases where corporate giants have been fought by consumer groups and sometimes it has led to change. Often it has just led to quasi changes such as the forestry industry launching its own non-governmental organization - the Forest Stewardship Council

    ===> http://www.fsc.org/

    Activists have managed to raise consumers awareness regarding tropical forests. It forced the logging industry to change its practices except for some ....

    But did it stop us from no longer purchasing furtniture or floors made of tropical woods? NOT, so were we successful in getting things changed.... ?

    I appreciate all these campaigns but consumers have short-term memories. Moreover, we all can live with apparent conflicts (e.g., trying or claiming to be "green," while owning a car) without loosing sleep over it.

    Having said the above, this does not explain why Nestlé failed to manage the social media challenge as one would expect from a marketing savvy organization. I am still trying to understand that one.

    Aldo, thanks for sharing.
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    Tim Gier
    (not a XING member)
    Urs:

    I don't want to hijack this thread, and I know nothing about the particulars about which you speak, but if I understand your point, it is absolutely true that high profile campaigns against certain social injustices often serve as little more than fundraising efforts for the groups involved, while leading to little, if any, lasting social change.

    For example, in the case of Animal Rights, large and well funded groups have been campaigning for decades to reduce the suffering & use of farm animals with two noticeable results: humans consume more animals today than ever before in our history and these groups have more money than ever before in theirs. Most troubling, the lives and the conditions of their deaths are, if anything, worse for animals in the aggregate now than at anytime in the past.

    One has to wonder what the point of it all really is.
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    Tim Gier
    (not a XING member)
    Olga:

    You might find this article about the uses of Social Media interesting:

    http://blog.thoughtpick.com/2010/03/carlton-draught-beer-lea...

    Salient point: "The only thing that the campaign has created is a gloomy cloud around a much loved brand on the internet, basically chipping away at its reputation of being a fresh and forward-looking brand."
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