Social Media Monitoring

Social Media Monitoring

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  • Chiara Bolognini
    Chiara Bolognini
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    It's a common and obvious perception that teens are the future, in addition about 80% of teen internet users visit social networks at least one time a month.
    To keep your business ahead of the digital curve it is important to take in consideration the teenagers behaviors on social media.

    Actually a recent 2010 survey done by MyYearbook (the most teens-crowded social network) and Ketchum (on of the largest North American PR Agency) was meant to find an answer to the question "How brands can influence the teenagers influencers"?

    The top 15% most active and engaged members were defined as influencers and it turned out:
    - teenagers sign up for social networks mainly to chat with friends and to post personal content;
    - the most influential users care a lot about what their friends say, and don't care about marketers;
    - only 5% trust of influencers trust what they hear from ads most and 5% trust information from companies on myYearbook;
    - influencers are more likely than other teens to share purchase decision information with their friends and to recommend a variety of products to their friends.
    So these highly trusted friends are the most powerful word-of-mouth social media "tool".

    However, the crucial result which answers the survey question - "How brands can influence the teenagers influencers?" - was that teens prefer brands to communicate straightforwardly and not to act as they were friends.

    Finally what is also appreciated is when a brand can be "edgy, funny or shocking—as long as it is done well" and in new ways.

    (Sources: Emarketing, Myyearbook, Ketchum, Coscore and Quantcast).
    If you are eager to see some graphs, see them at http://tinyurl.com/27endct

    What do you think about that? What would be your strategy to reach the target group of your today or of the near future business?
    This post was modified on 14 Jun 2010 at 05:35 pm.
  • Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker
    Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Chiara

    Great just maybe two or three things I like to add

    1 - Sample was made up of 10,000 myYearbook users were surveyed, with the top 15% most active and engaged members defined as influencers.

    2 - In the US "myYearbook is the most-visited Website by teens, according to comScore, and Quantcast data shows its users skew female—not unusual for teen social sites—and white."

    3 - The study included "... aged 13-19 who were the most active social networkers on myYearbook.com."


    The above indicates that the findings apply to the USA but not necessarily to anywhere else. Also we do not know if Yearbook.com teenies are representative of all teenagers (e.g., those that use MySpace, Facebook or no social network site at all?).

    More information about the survey from Ketchum, the agency that conducted this study on behalf of myYearbook can also be found here:

    =====> http://newsroom.ketchum.com/news-releases/teen-social-media-...

    One conclusion I found that made me pause:

    ===> "Teens are more likely to click, read, or pass along humorous or shocking content, especially if it involves a celebrity."

    BUT does one's teenage son or girl purchased product/service based on recommendations from influencers on such social networks as myYearbook?

    What is your opinion?

    Chiara thanks for sharing.
    This post was modified on 15 Jun 2010 at 11:58 am.
  • Stan Albers
    Stan Albers    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Just attended the #12 Webinar, thanks Urs and Deborah!

    As it seems, teens use influencers to reduce the wealth of unweighted information the internet provides and/or overwhelmes them with. Authors like Reiter who in Germany published a book called "Dumm 3.0" (i.e. "Stupid 3.0") argue that before the internet occured this weighting was done by journalism.

    According to such authors, the internet replaced weighted information by crude information that nobody can really handle, so that, within internet, new variants of weighting must be found.

    So in a sense, the internet logic as a logic of computing is not really fit to fulfill the purpose it pretends to fulfill, as only weighted information can be a secure basis for personal action.
    This post was modified on 16 Jun 2010 at 10:40 am.
  • Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker
    Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Stan

    Thanks for the praise.... especially since you have attended most of them you have a pretty good idea how they changed over time :-)

    About the influencers you point out above:

    My first response is ---- turning social media metrics into dollars

    our next webinar http://university.commetrics.com/?p=572 (just click on button to register), longer explanation/description of content comes out 2010-06-17 here: http://university.commetrics.com/?p=568

    HOW DOES THIS RELATE TO INFLUENCERS?
    Well for me it is always an issue what we are talking about:

    - tooth paste
    - lip stick
    - bread
    - music CD
    - refrigerator
    - smartphone
    - computer
    - tool box
    - etc

    Do we purchase these products the same way and what influences our purchasing decision.
    For instance, what tooth paste I purchase could be influenced by what my dentist says, especially if she recommends a particular brand (often two or three) in cases where the patient has highly sensitive gums.

    I for one might be influenced by a consumer organization having tested these toothpaste brands against each other, such as Stiftung Warentest or Consumer Reports.
    Another factor could be price and availability of the brand at my favorite store.

    But purchasing a printer or a computer is different than toothpaste. One is a bit more expensive.
    I listen to friends but I am particularly interested to hear what their experiences are. Hence, what you believe about a product is not that interesting. If you have used it including having experiences regarding usability and warranty service, then I want to know how you feel about the product and why.

    Maybe I am a somewhat different type of consumer than the majority of people.
    To be blunt, influencers, do I care? Not at all, I care only about reviews/assessments from people whom I trust and who actually have used the product for a while in a similar context as I will do if I go out and purchase it.

    This influencer stuff is very interesting but I am sceptical and sometimes it seems more hype than anything else. Of course, some people do get affected by what famous people do or want to have a Gucci bag because their idol has a few hundreds of these bags in the walk in closet (as pictured in Vogue).
    Okay..... but not me :-)

    So I have yet to see somebody who has demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that measuring regarding influencers on social networks like Xing, Facebook, myYearbook does really make a difference to your bottom line.

    Turning such social media metrics into dollars is a challenge we have yet to master.

    But we will address this during the webinar - for sure

    Stan thanks for sharing and please join next week's webinar.
  • Stan Albers
    Stan Albers    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Prof. Dr. Urs E. Gattiker schrieb:

    This influencer stuff is very interesting but I am sceptical and sometimes it seems more hype than anything else ...
    I am afraid I didn´t make my point very well.

    It will indeed be tough to lay hands on these influencers.

    What fascinates me is that the internet user necessarily needs a qualifying filter function of some sorts in order to make sense out of the abundance of raw material. One such filter function can be an influencer. But there can be, and indeed are, many other means of making sense out of the internet.

    Thanks, Urs, for answering.
  • Chiara Bolognini
    Chiara Bolognini
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    Urs, thanks for pointing out that these stats are related to US teens.
    If you find a world wide research which can fit anyone just let me know, because I am gonna start a new blog about teens and social media.

    For the time being the US are the best sources I have found in terms of stats and I see we could be content also with that because it gives some idea about what's up in the teen social media world.

    By the way, the cultural filter is just one of the tool through which we have to squeeze the big online information bunch which is overwhelming us.

    Is Stan's stance for finding an hub, a pivot, a reference to filter this online massive information a cultural/local need, a global need or a generation need?

    Will the teens be able to swim in the online information ocean better than us? The good sense tells me YES, they will. Just because they are social media natives and this tells us more than figures.
    However, I am not forgetting that our generation is building new tools to filter information ;-)

    So if Stan quoted Dumm3.0 to say that journalism was considered a good filter for the raw information, I can say that I have never seen journalism in this way (I am 34) and someone is gonna kill me for that because this opinion meant million of loss for all the editorial industry.

    Actually what's happening today is giving me reasons for confirming a widely shared hypothesis that the journalism in its old way of being doesn't apply to the need of first hand information people need today.
    There is more than this: the need of sharing this information, the need of making this information democratic in terms of mass participation.
    An important motivation was the need to have trustful information, which is what we will possibly and slightly lose again. We will, but in favor of what?

    In few words the way we make business each other adopted the powerful tool of social media and we as clients/users we'll be able to read information we want and throw out what we won't or don't need quickly without wasting paper. It is true we'll delete very interesting stuff sometimes, but we are not pretending to live stuck in our computer, laptops, smart phone, tablets to select good/bad information for the rest of our life, are we?

    As for the influencers, I find the possibility of becoming an online influencer very interesting and powerful. On the other hand, no way, it will become as more difficult and expensive in the future as it is building a new community today.

    In fact a platform with simple posts, pictures and updates was invading the world few years ago.
    Nowadays communities like Facebook are in number of million and if there is no iphone application, photo rotating tool, a new game everyday your community is cut out.

    All companies are actually investing a lot of money in social media at the moment and the expenditure is considerable growing in all industries.
    We cannot prevent social media from becoming a business, it is already so.

    Our lighthouse would be the influencers now, mhhh.
    Well, massive influencers aren't as pure anymore as journalism wasn't when it was considered a reference for the world ears. Keep your brain on its toes, that's what teens surely do.

    Will then the teen massive influencers become "soldiers" for brands?
    I bet, they will and they are! That's much better than selling puppets.
    This post was modified on 17 Jun 2010 at 05:51 pm.
  • Stan Albers
    Stan Albers    Premium Member   Group moderator
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    Is Stan's stance for finding an hub, a pivot, a reference to filter this online massive information a cultural/local need, a global need or a generation need?
    Hi Chiara, thanks for posting. You make me feel old ...!

    Will the teens be able to swim in the online information ocean better than us? The good sense tells me YES, they will. Just because they are social media natives and this tells us more than figures.
    In fact, if I see my 13 year old son using the internet I must admit that you are right.

    As for the influencers, I find the possibility of becoming an online influencer very interesting and powerful.
    Thanks Chiara for making clear to me that with Loewenmut this is what we want: To become influencers heightening people´s awareness of and attitude towards the other people on this planet that suffer from severe and multiple disabilities.

    Will then the teen massive influencers become "soldiers" for brands?
    I bet, they will and they are!
 
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